Montag 20. November 2017
Socialisms in Development
Volume XXXIII • Issue 3 • 2017

This special issue appears on the occasion of the centenary of the Russian October Revolution and deals with the interrelations of two phenomena that are, historically, closely related with this event: socialism and development. The Soviet Union became the first state socialist model of development in existence, but other socialisms, whether by revolution or peaceful transition, followed. As state socialism spread, it also developed and diverged through the creative adaptation to changing local and global circumstances. Showing how people and ideas circulated through East-South and South-South relations, this issue broadens our understanding of the global historical dimension of development as its highlights the variety and interrelations of socialist experiences and analyses forms of both cooperation and competition between socialisms in the wake of decolonisation and the Cold War.

 

Schwerpunktredaktion: Eric Burton

Print ISSN: 0258-2384│Online ISSN: 2414-3197

 

                                                                                          

Ausgabe kaufen

Inhalt dieser Ausgabe
Burton, Eric

Socialisms in Development: Revolution, Divergence and Crisis, 1917–1991

Sprache: ENGLISCHSeiten: 4-20https://doi.org/10.20446/JEP-2414-3197-33-3-4
  • Abstract
  • Literatur
  • Keywords

This special issue appears on the occasion of the centenary of the Russian October Revolution and deals with the interrelations of two phenomena that are, historically, closely related with this event: socialism and development. The Soviet Union became the first state socialist model of development in existence, but other socialisms, whether by revolution or peaceful transition, followed. As state socialism spread, it also developed and diverged through the creative adaptation to changing local and global circumstances. Showing how people and ideas circulated through East-South and South-South relations, this issue broadens our understanding of the global historical dimension of development as its highlights the variety and interrelations of socialist experiences and analyses forms of both cooperation and competition between socialisms in the wake of decolonisation and the Cold War.

Adi, Hakim (2013): Pan-Africanism and Communism. The Communist International, Africa and the diaspora, 1919-1939. Trenton, NJ: Africa World Press.


Becker, Joachim (2009): Anatomie der Sozialismen. In: Becker, Joachim/Weissenbacher, Rudy (eds.): Sozialismen. Entwicklungsmodelle von Lenin bis Nyerere. Wien. Promedia, 13–56.


Bernstein, Thomas P./Li, Hua-yu (eds., 2010): China Learns from the Soviet Union, 1949-present. Lanham: Lexington Books.


Bierschenk, Thomas (2014): From the Anthropology of Development to the Anthropology of Global Social Engineering. In: Zeitschrift für Ethnologie 139, 73–98.


Bini, Elisabetta/Garavini, Giuliano/Romero, Federico (eds., 2016): Oil Shock. The 1973 Crisis and Its Economic Legacy. London: I.B. Tauris.


Bockman, Johanna (2013): Markets in the Name of Socialism: The Left-Wing Origins of Neoliberalism. Stanford: Stanford University Press.


Boden, Ragna (2006): Die Grenzen der Weltmacht. Sowjetische Indonesienpolitik von Stalin bis Brežnev. Stuttgart: F. Steiner.


Burgess, G. Thomas (2007): A Socialist Diaspora: Ali Sultan Issa, the Soviet Union and the Zanzibari Revolution. In: Matusevich, Maxim (ed.): Africa in Russia, Russia in Africa. Three centuries of encounters. Trenton, NJ: Africa World Press, 263–291.


Burgess, G. Thomas (2009): Race, revolution, and the struggle for human rights in Zanzibar. The memoirs of Ali Sultan Issa and Seif Sharif Hamad. Athens: Ohio University Press.


Burton, Eric (2016): African Manpower Development during the Global Cold War. The Case of Tanzanian Students in the Two German States. In: Exenberger, Andreas/Pallua, Ulrich (eds.): Africa Research in Austria. Approaches and Perspectives. Innsbruck: Innsbruck University Press, 101–134.


Byrne, Jeffrey James (2016): Mecca of Revolution. Algeria, Decolonization, and the Third World Order. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199899142.001.0001 


Chari, Sharad/Corbridge, Stuart (eds., 2008): The development reader. London: Routledge.
Cleaver, Harry (1992): Socialism. In: Sachs, Wolfgang (ed.): The Development Dictionary. London. Zed Books, 233–245.


Cooper, Frederick (2010): Writing the History of Development. In: Journal of Modern European History 8(1), 5–23. https://doi.org/10.17104/1611-8944_2010_1_5 


Donham, Donald L. (1999): Marxist Modern: An Ethnographic History of the Ethiopian Revolution. Los Angeles: University of California Press.


Döring, Hans-Joachim (1999): Es geht um unsere Existenz. Die Politik der DDR gegenüber der Dritten Welt am Beispiel von Mosambik und Äthiopien. Berlin: Links.


Drew, Allison (2014): Communism in Africa. In: Smith, S. A. (ed.): The Oxford Handbook of the History of Communism. Oxford/New York. Oxford University Press, 285–300. https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199602056.013.003 


Engerman, David C. (2011): The Second World’s Third World. In: Kritika: Explorations in Russian and Eurasian History 12(1), 183–211.


Fischer, Karin/Hauck, Gerhard/Boatcă, Manuela (eds., 2016): Handbuch Entwicklungsforschung. Wiesbaden: Springer VS.


Fischer, Karin/Parnreiter, Christof (1997): Editorial: Sozialistische Entwicklungsländer. In: Journal für Entwicklungspolitik XIII(2), 129–131. https://doi.org/10.20446/JEP-2414-3197-13-2-129 


Friedman, Jeremy Scott (2015): Shadow Cold War. The Sino-Soviet Competition for the Third World. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press. https://doi.org/10.5149/northcarolina/9781469623764.001.0001 


Gleijeses, Piero (2002): Conflicting Missions. Havana, Washington, and Africa, 1959-1976. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.


Gleijeses, Piero (2006): Moscow’s Proxy? Cuba and Africa 1975-1988. In: Journal of Cold War Studies 8(2), 3–51. https://doi.org/10.1162/jcws.2006.8.2.3 


Goebel, Michael (2015): Anti-Imperial Metropolis. Interwar Paris and the Seeds of Third World Nationalism. New York: Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139681001 

 


Grandner, Margarete/Sonderegger, Arno (eds., 2015): Nord-Süd-Ost-West-Beziehungen. Eine Einführung in die Globalgeschichte. Wien: Mandelbaum.


Hilger, Andreas (2017): 1967. Lenins Erben und die nationale Revolution in der Dritten Welt. In: Behrends, Jan C./Katzer, Nikolaus/Lindenberger, Thomas (eds.): 100 Jahre Roter Oktober. Zur Weltgeschichte der Russischen Revolution. Berlin: Ch. Links, 159–180.


Hobsbawm, Eric (1994): Age of Extremes. The Short Twentieth Century 1914-1991. London: Abacus.


Hobsbawm, Eric (2011): How to change the world. Tales of Marx and Marxism. New Haven: Yale University Press.


Hodge, Joseph Morgan (2016): Writing the History of Development (Part 2: Longer, Deeper, Wider). In: Humanity 7(1), 125–174. https://doi.org/10.1353/hum.2016.0004 


Iandolo, Alessandro (2012): The rise and fall of the ‘Soviet Model of Development’ in West Africa, 1957–64. In: Cold War History 12(4), 683–704. https://doi.org/10.1080/14682745.2011.649255


Kaple, Deborah (2016): Agents of Change. Soviet Advisers and High Stalinist Management in China, 1949–1960. In: Journal of Cold War Studies 18(1), 5–30. https://doi.org/10.1162/JCWS_a_00617


Katsakioris, Constantin (2011): Sowjetische Bildungsförderung für afrikanische und asiatische Länder. In: Greiner, Bernd /Müller, Tim B. /Weber, Claudia (eds.): Macht und Geist im Kalten Krieg. Hamburg: HIS, 396–415.


Kotkin, Stephen (2010): The Kiss of Debt. The Eastern Bloc goes borrowing. In: Niall Ferguson, Niall/Maier, Charles S./Manela, Erez/Sargent, Daniel J. (eds.): The shock of the global. The 1970s in perspective. Cambridge, Mass.: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 80–94.


Lorenzini, Sara (2014): Comecon and the South in the years of détente. A study on East–South economic relations. In: European Review of History 21(2), 183–199. https://doi.org/10.1080/13507486.2014.888708


Lüthi, Lorenz M. (2008): The Sino-Soviet Split. Cold war in the Communist World. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.


Matusevich, Maxim (2009): Revisiting the Soviet Moment in Sub-Saharan Africa. In: History Compass 7(5), 1259–1268. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1478-0542.2009.00626.x


Mazov, Sergei V. (2010): A distant front in the Cold War: The USSR in West Africa and the Congo, 1956-1964. Washington, D.C.: Woodrow Wilson Center Press.


McClellan, Woodford (2007): Black Hajj to ‘Red Mecca’: Africans and Afro-Americans at KUTV, 1925-1938. In: Matusevich, Maxim (ed.): Africa in Russia, Russia in Africa. Three centuries of encounters. Trenton, NJ. Africa World Press, 61–84.


Monson, Jamie (2009): Africa’s freedom railway. How a Chinese development project changed lives and livelihoods in Tanzania. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.


Muehlenbeck, Philip (2016): Czechoslovakia in Africa, 1945-1968. New York: Palgrave. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-137-56666-9


Newman, Michael (2005): Socialism. A very short introduction. Oxford/New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/actrade/9780192804310.001.0001


Pitcher, M. Anne/Askew, Kelly M. (2006): African Socialisms and Postsocialisms. In: Africa 76(1), 1–14. https://doi.org/10.3366/afr.2006.0001


Prashad, Vijay (2008): The darker nations. A people’s history of the Third World. New York/London: New Press.


Prashad, Vijay (2013): The poorer nations. A possible history of the global South. London: Verso.


Rist, Gilbert (2008): The history of development. From Western origins to global faith. London/New York: Zed.


Rupprecht, Tobias (2015): Soviet internationalism after Stalin. Interaction and exchange between the USSR and Latin America during the Cold War. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781316212769


Saint Martin, Monique de/Scarfò Ghellab, Grazia/Mellakh, Kamal (eds., 2015): Étudier à l’Est. Expériences de diplômés africains. Paris: Karthala.


Sanchez-Sibony, Oscar (2014): Red Globalization. The Political Economy of the Soviet Cold War from Stalin to Khrushchev. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139628778


Scott, James C. (1998): Seeing like a state. How certain schemes to improve the human condition have failed. New Haven: Yale University Press.


Slobodian, Quinn (ed., 2015): Comrades of Color. East Germany in the Cold War World. New York: Berghahn Books.


Ther, Philipp (2014): Die neue Ordnung auf dem alten Kontinent. Eine Geschichte des neoliberalen Europa. Berlin: Suhrkamp.


Wemheuer, Felix (2016): Einleitung: Marxismus und der globale Süden. In: Felix Wemheuer (ed.): Marx und der globale Süden. Köln: PapyRossa Verlag, 7–29.


Westad, Odd Arne (2007): The global Cold War. Third world interventions and the making of our times. Cambridge/New York: Cambridge University Press.

Socialisms, Development, Revolution, Divergence, Crisis

Marung, Steffi

‘Leninian moment’? Soviet Africanists and the Interpretation of the October Revolution, 1950s–1970s

Sprache: ENGLISCHSeiten: 21-48https://doi.org/10.20446/JEP-2414-3197-33-3-21
  • Abstract

The October Revolution was pivotal in the globalisation of socialism as a claim-making device. Soviet Africanists interpreting the revolution and its legacy vis-à-vis African dynamics were part of this process. The more the revolution became an event of the distant past, the more it was mobilised as a short hand for post-colonial development and the repositioning of societies in a new global order. This article sheds light on the transfers and circulations of these ideas during the 1950s to the 1970s, and how these impacted on the understandings of socialist development in the Soviet Union. The experiences of Soviet scholars with and in ‘Africa’ played a crucial role for the co-production of such concepts: academic as well as personal frustrations became a driver for change of Soviet Africanists’ theorisations on development and socialism in Africa.

Admasie, Samuel Andreas

Official Marxism and Socialist Development in Ethiopia: Rhetoric and Reality

Sprache: ENGLISCHSeiten: 49-68https://doi.org/10.20446/JEP-2414-3197-33-3-49
  • Abstract

In the aftermath of the 1974 Ethiopian revolution, the government came to adopt an official strand of Marxism that featured a number of characteristics inherited from the late Soviet interpretation of its own experience, and a number of instrumentalist contortions corresponding to the interest of the emergent dominant strata. This generated contradictions between the emancipatory ideational categories employed and the social-material characteristics of the actual process of attempted development. Nowhere were these contradictions greater than in the manufacturing sector, where exhortations and demands for sacrifice on the part of the working class were only matched by the – increasingly farcical – rhetorical place of prominence of that class. By focussing on the rhetorical aims, the practical means, and the achievements recorded in this sector, this article aims to analyse the concrete manner in which these contradictions manifested themselves. The findings indicate that the effort to construct and develop a socialist economy – narrowly defined as such in terms of the judicial form of ownership – failed on a number of levels. This failure is traced back to the nature of power relations in ‘Socialist Ethiopia’, and draws attention to the manner in which the ideology of ‘state socialism’, which shifts attention from the aim of revolutionising productive relations to the development of productive forces under state ownership, has generally been used to legitimise the rule of bureaucratic categories and to conceal exploitative relations prevailing under such rule. In this, the article draws on Marxist theorisation and critique of that ideology.

Unfried, Berthold

A Cuban Cycle of Developmental Socialism? Cubans and East Germans in the Socialist World System

Sprache: ENGLISCHSeiten: 69-90https://doi.org/10.20446/JEP-2414-3197-33-3-69
  • Abstract

Based essentially on archive-material from the GDR – and some from Cuba – this contribution demonstrates how the interactions between the German Democratic Republic and Cuba were projected into a multilateral cooperation in Africa in the framework of the socialist world system. The circulation of material and personal resources – advisors, experts, solidarity workers of European socialist countries in Cuba, Cuban workers in Europe, Cuban Internacionalistas in Africa, the thousands of students from Africa at the Isla de la Juventud in Cuba – constituted spheres of international connectivity within the socialist world system in the era of its expansion to the three continents Asia, Africa and Latin America. In this period of alternative ‘globalization’ from the mid-1970s to 1990, Cuba, as a member of the Council of Mutual Economic Assistance (CMEA/COMECON), established itself as a trans-continental hub between the European centre of that system and its African periphery. The contribution concludes by summing up elements of a ‘Cuban cycle’ of ‘anti-imperialist’ developmental socialism as the last of the long reverberations of the October Revolution.

Pettinà, Vanni; Kalinovsky, Artemy M.

From Countryside to Factory: Industrialisation, Social Mobility, and Neoliberalism in Soviet Central Asia and Mexico

Sprache: ENGLISCHSeiten: 91-118https://doi.org/10.20446/JEP-2414-3197-33-3-91
  • Abstract

This article traces the rise and decline of state-led industrialisation as a tool of social mobility in the second half of the twentieth century. It examines ideas of transforming primarily agrarian societies into industrial states in the USSR and developing countries, and then considers how these ideas were applied in two cases: Mexico and Soviet Central Asia. In both cases, state-led industrialisation achieved some important social goals, but ultimately proved disappointing and was deemphasized in the 1980s. Politicians and planners increasingly emphasised individual entrepreneurship and a more limited role for the state as a path to achieving greater social mobility. The article argues that while external ideological and economic factors were important in both cases, attention must also be paid to the way scholars and planners reflected on the shortcomings of the industrialisation programme conceived in the post-war decades.

Kontakt
Mattersburger Kreis für Entwicklungspolitik
an den österreichischen Universitäten
Sensengasse 3
1090 Wien, Österreich

T +43 1 317 40 17
E office@mattersburgerkreis.at
Abonnieren Sie unseren Newsletter
© 2015 Mattersburger Kreis für Entwicklungspolitik an den österreichischen Universitäten | Impressum
Darstellung:
http://www.mattersburgerkreis.at/